Songs with dating violence

The 2013 national Youth Risk Behavior Survey found approximately 10% of high school students reported physical victimization and 10% reported sexual victimization from a dating partner in the 12 months* before they were surveyed. All too often these examples suggest that violence in a relationship is normal, but violence is never acceptable.

The Crystals, “He Hit Me (It Felt Like A Kiss)”Though intended by writers Gerry Goffin and Carole King as a sympathetic story—inspired by their onetime babysitter, pop singer Little Eva—about an abusive relationship, 1962’s “He Hit Me (It Felt Like A Kiss)” was largely perceived as an endorsement of domestic abuse.

Unhealthy relationships can start early and last a lifetime.

Teens often think some behaviors, like teasing and name calling, are a “normal” part of a relationship.

Although subdued by the gun-ho standards of “Gunpowder & Lead” or “Goodbye Earl,” “Independence Day” (written by Gretchen Peters) lands some solid blows, particularly in its condemnation of a community that let the abuse continue unchecked.

‘Tere Bina’ by British Asian Artist Avina Shah raises awareness on the delicate issue of domestic violence.

Proceeds from the single will be donated to West London based charity the Southall Black Sisters (SBS).

“His fist is big, but my gun’s bigger,” she sings, bridging the gap between self-defense and schoolyard taunt.

“He’ll find out when I pull the trigger.” Like the other songs on Lambert’s Crazy Ex-Girlfriend, “Gunpowder & Lead” presents her as a kick-ass chick with a hair-trigger temper—definitely not the type an abusive man should come home to when he makes bail.

Tip: when at all possible allow teens to plan and carry out events.

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